First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
Animal Bites

There is a risk of infection with any animal bite, no matter how small. The bite should be assessed by a doctor as soon as possible to see if a tetanus or rabies injection, or a course of antibiotics, is required. First aid treatment for bites is to keep the wound clean and control any bleeding.

ANIMAL BITES

Any animal bite requires medical attention. Deep bites can cause serious wounds, severe bleeding, and tissue damage, while all animal bites can cause infection. Puncture wounds from teeth carry infection deep into the tissue, whiles scratches are also an infection risk. The human bite is among the most infectious.

CHECKING FOR INFECTION

Warn the injured person to watch for signs of an infected wound over the coming days. Seek immediate medical attention if any combination of the following signs and symptoms develops:

  • Increased pain
  • Swelling
  • Redness around the site of the wound
  • Discharge from the site
  • Unpleasant smell from the site of the wound
  • Red tracks from the site of the wound to the heart
  • Swollen glands

TREATMENT

The priority is to ensure the safety of yourself and bystanders. If the animal is still a risk, do not approach it but call the local Animal Control Service through your police department.

For serious wounds

  1. Help the injured person sit down to help reduce shock.
  2. Treat any bleeding by:
  • Looking in the wound
  • Applying direct pressure
  • Elevating the site if it is a limb
  1. Take or send the person to hospital.

For smaller wounds and scratches

  1. Wash the wounds thoroughly with soap and water.
  2. Dry the wound with clean gauze or other non-fluffy material and cover with a dressing.
  3. Seek medical advice.

SPECIFIC INFECTIONS SPREAD BY BITES

Rabies

Rabies is an increasingly rare but potentially very serious, even fatal, condition carried by animal bites. Rabies in the US is rare, but if the bite is from an animal that may have come into the country without going through normal checks, or if you are bitten overseas, then seek immediate medical attention. There is no cure for rabies but early vaccination following a bite can help develop immunity.

Hepatitis B and C

There is a small chance that hepatitis B and C may be transmitted by a human bite. If concerned, seek medical advice.

Tetanus

Tetanus bacteria carry a particular risk when carried deep into a wound with jagged edges or a puncture wound. Animal bites carry a potential risk of tetanus. Tetanus affects the central nervous system and can cause muscle spasms, breathing problems, and sometimes death. It is also known as lockjaw because it may tense up the jaw muscles. There is a vaccination for tetanus but immunity is not lifelong and nobody suffering a potentially hazardous injury should seek medical advice on having a booster injection.

 
 
 
Abdominal Pain

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue