First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
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Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
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Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
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First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
Hysteria, Hiccups and Panic Attack

The word hysteria has come to mean the extreme behavior exhibited at time of high emotion. This can be positive emotion, for example, delight at a pop concert, or negative emotion, for example, the shock of hearing bad news. Hiccups are caused by an involuntary contraction of diaphragm, the muscle that separates the lung and stomach cavities. They are very common and although not serious can be irritating and tiring if an attack continues.

TREATING HYSTERIA
Although this type of behavior may appear to be extreme, the affected person’s feelings are very real to him or her. Hysteria is often a common and, some would argue, healthy response to situations of high stress.
  1. Speak to the affected person firmly but quietly. Do not shout at her.

  2. Move the person away from onlookers as subconsciously she may be reacting to the crowd.

  3. Encourage the person to focus on breathing. If she is suffering from the effects of hyperventilation, such as cramps in the hands or dizziness, hand over a paper bag and advise her to breathe her own exhaled air.

  4. Stay with the person until she has recovered.

  5. Check the person for injury or any underlying medical condition, and treat as appropriate.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HYSTERIA

  • Screaming, shouting, and uncontrollable crying

  • Hyperventilation (breathing too fast)—this may lead to dizziness and, or trembling

  • An apparent inability to move (the person may appear to be rooted to the spot)

  • Aggressive behavior (the person may direct this toward himself)

Above

Attacks of hiccups usually last for only a few minutes and are not serious. There are many home remedies for treating hiccups, such as holding the breath or drinking a glass of water from the wrong side.

Above

To control hiccups or a panic attack, a person should breathe in and out slowly into a paper bag 10 times then breathe normally for another 10 breathes. This should continued until breathing is normal.

TREATING HICCUPS

There are various suggested treatments for hiccups.

  • Give the affected person a paper bag and encourage her to re-breathe her own exhaled air.
  • Make the person drink from the wrong side of a cup.
  • Tell the person to hold her breath for as long as possible.

All these treatments work by increasing the level of carbon dioxide in the blood, which has a positive effect on breathing.

If hiccups persist for more than 30 minutes, or the person is exhausted, seek medical advice.

PANIC ATTACKS

Panic attacks are sudden instances of extreme anxiety accompanied by alarming physical symptoms such as chest pains, breathing problems, sweating, stomach pains, palpitations (awareness of an abnormally fast heartbeat) dizziness, and faintness. The best way to treat this to encourage the sufferer to stay calm and to remember that the attack will soon pass. Rapid, shallow breathing can be helped by breathing into a paper bag. Relaxation exercises can help a person reduce anxiety levels. If a person has a frequent panic attacks, she should see a doctor.
 
 
 
Abdominal Pain

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
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Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
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Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
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Poisoning
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Drug Poisoning
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Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue