First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
Treating other Types of Burn

The general principle of treating burns remains to cool and cover the affected area but some types of burn need extra consideration. With burns to the neck and mouth, beyond the risk of shock and infection, the greatest potential problem is the risk of airway obstruction due to swelling. The obvious additional danger with electrical burns is the combination of water as a treatment and electricity as the cause.

TREATING THE BURNS TO THE NECK AND MOUTH

  1. Check the victim’s airway and breathing and be prepared to resuscitate if necessary.
  2. Call an ambulance and reassure the victim until help arrives.
  3. Get the victim into a position where his breathing is comfortable (this will usually be sitting up).
  4. Loosen any constriction around the neck to ease breathing. Keep the airway clear.
  5. Cool any burns continuously—do not attempt to cover.
  6. Maintain a check on the victim’s airway and breathing.

LIGHTNING

Although rare, lightning strikes do happen and can kill. If caught outside in a thunderstorm, seek shelter in a car or building.

If there is no shelter, make yourself as low as possible, minimize your contact with the ground by crouching and avoid single trees, bodies of water, and tall objects.

If a person has been struck by lightning, check the airway and breathing, be prepared to resuscitate, treat any burns, and call for help.

ELECTRICAL BURNS

If a victims has suffered from an electric shock, do not attempt to touch the person unless you are absolutely certain that he or she no longer in contact with the live equipment. If the person is still attached to an electrical current, your best option is to turn the electricity off at the main breaker. If you cannot access the breaker, you may able to turn off electrical equipment at the wall socket but be particularly careful that you do not touch the victim or any live equipment.

If there is no way to turn the electricity off, you can attempt to move the victim away from the point of contact using a non-conducting material such as a broom handle. Be sure to insulate yourself as much as possible by wearing rubber gloves and shoes, and by standing on a telephone directory.

Electricity demands respect—if in doubt, call in professional help. Do not push yourself in any danger.

TREATING ELECTRICAL BURNS

A victim suffering from an electrical burn may well have respiratory or circulatory difficulties. An electrical discharge across the heart can make the heart stop beating, so be prepared to resuscitate the victim over and above the treatment of any burn that may be present.

  1. Make absolutely sure that there is no further risk from the electricity.
  2. Check to see whether the victim is conscious, if unconscious, check airway and breathing and take action as appropriate.
  3. Treat any burns with cold water if safe to do so.
  4. Cover burns as appropriate with sterile, non-fluffy dressings.
  5. Seek urgent medical attention. Stay with the victim and reassure him until medical help arrives.

HIGH-VOLTAGE ELECTRICITY

High-voltage electricity (power lines, subway tracks, overhead power cables, etc.)

Usually kills immediately, causing severe burns, heart problems, and potentially even broken bones and internal injuries as the victim is thrown by the shock. If somebody has been hit, your first priority is to keep yourself and the other bystander safe. High-voltage currents can jump some distance so keep people back at least 60 feet and call for professional help via 911.

 
 
 
Vomiting and Diarrhea

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue