First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
Rescue Breathing for Children and Babies

If a child has lost consciousness and is not breathing, you will need to provide rescue breathing in order to prevent brain damage and heart failure. When a child is not breathing, the cause is very likely to be a problem with the intake of oxygen, for example, through drowning, an accident or through choking.

The priority, therefore, is to provide oxygen. If you are by yourself and an ambulance has not yet been called, do not leave to call an ambulance until you have given a minute’s worth of rescue breathing (or if the circulation has also stopped, a minute’s worth of CPR, where rescue breathing is combined with chest compressions).

RESCUE BREATHING FOR A CHILD

1. Place the child on his back. Open airway by tilting the head and lifting the chin up with your fingers.

2. Pinch the soft part of the nose closed with the finger and thumb of the hand that was on the forehead. Open the mouth.

3. Take a deep breath to fill your lungs with air and place your lips around the child’s mouth, making sure you have a good seal.

4. Blow into the mouth and watch the chest rise. Maintaining head tilt and chin lift, remove your mouth and watch the chest fall.

RESCUE BREATHING FOR A BABY

1. Open the airway by lifting the chin. Use minimum head tilt.

2. You may find it easier to seal your mouth over the baby’s mouth and nose separately. Open the infant’s mouth. Empty your cheeks of air rather than blowing hard into the mouth. Watch the chest rise.

3. Keeping the baby’s chin lifted, take your mouth away and watch the chest fall. An effective is one where you can see the chest rise and fall, and your aim is to give 2 effective breaths. Try up to 5 attempts to give 2 effective breaths.

WHAT TO DO IF THE CHEST DOES NOT RISE

• Check for any obvious obstruction around the neck or on the chest which may be preventing the breath from going again.

• Re-open the airway. Tilt the head, look for and remove any obvious obstructions, and lift the chin.

• Re-seal the nose and mouth and breathe in again.

• Try up to 5 attempts to give 2 effective breaths.

If the chest still does not rise, it is likely that the airway is blocked either by an object such as food or vomit, or because the air passages have swollen up due to a condition such as anaphylaxis. In these circumstances, the best treatment is to move straight to CPR---combining further attempts at rescue breathing with chest compressions.

ABC FOR RESUSCITATION FOR CHILDREN

Airway Use head tilt and chin lift to keep an open airway while providing rescue breathing.

Breathing Provide rescue breathing to a child or a baby who is not breathing.

Circulation Check for signs of circulation.

CHECKING FOR CIRCULATION

After giving 2 effective breaths, the next step in the ABC of first aid is to check that the oxygen is being circulated around the body. Look, listen, and feel for breathing, coughing, movement, normal color or any other sign of life for no more than 10 seconds.

If there are clear signs of circulation, then continue to give rescue breaths at a rate of 1 every 6 seconds, until help arrives or the child begin to breathe for himself. Continue to check for signs of circulation throughout.

If there are no signs of circulation, move to giving full CPR--- combining rescue breaths with chest compressions

In the case of face injury or if a child has been poisoned, give mouth-to-nose rescue breaths. Lift the chin, tilt the head, seal the mouth, and breathe into the child’s nose, removing your mouth to let air escape.

 
 
 
Rescue Breathing for Children and Babies

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue