First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
The Recovery Position for Children and Babies

The priorities for an unconscious child are to ensure that the child stays breathing by keeping the airway clear; and regularly looking, listening and feeling for breaths; to treat any life-threatening injuries; and to call for emergency help. If an unconscious child is breathing, do a quick check for life-threatening injuries and treat if necessary, then turn the victim into the recovery position.

HOW TO MOVE A CHILD INTO THE RECOVERY POSITION

1. Kneel beside the child. Remove glasses and any bulky objects from the pockets. Ensure the airway is open by lifting the chin and tilting the head. Make sure both legs are straight, then place the arm nearest to you to straight out from the child’s body, with the elbow bent and the palm placing upward.

2. Bring the arm furthest away from you across the child’s chest and hold the back of the hand against the cheek nearest you.

3. With your other hand, grasp the child’s far leg just above the knee and pull it up, keeping the foot flat on the ground.

4. Keeping the child’s hand pressed against her cheek, pull on the far leg and roll the child toward you and to her side. Adjust the upper leg so that both the hip and knee are bent in right angles.

5. Tilt the head back so that the airway remains open. If necessary, adjust the hand under the cheek to make sure the child’s head remains tilted and the airways stays open. Call for emergency help if this has not already been done. Check the breathing regularly, and check the lower arm for any loss of color or warmth. If it turns white or blue, or if it becomes cold, gently move it until the color or warmth returns.

RECOVERY POSITION FOR BABIES

For a baby or a very young child who is unconscious, the easiest way to maintain an open airways to cradle the infant face down over your arm, while supporting the head and neck with your hand.

WARNING

Never move a child if you suspect there is a spinal injury unless breathing is hindered or the child needs to be removed from danger.

 
 
 
Vomiting and Diarrhea

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue